Car Shows in Three-Dimensions

3D Hot Rod

I’ve been a fan of 3D photography since I first saw the movie Bwana Devil in 1952 and have been experimenting with it ever since. Remember the four-lensed Nimslo 3D camera that shot 35mm film that when processed in the company’s photo lab delivered remarkable lenticular prints that had a real 3D look. I recently had a chance to purchase a Panasonic Lumix 3D1. It has two 25mm lenses much like the classic Stereo Realist. I always wanted to own a Realist or even a Kodak Stereo camera but the Lumix 3D1 gave me the chance to do three dimensions digitally.

The Lumix 3D1 can shoot 12-megapixel 3D photos and the Venus processing engine lets it produce high-quality images, including traditional “flat” two-dimensional photos. It can shoot at 8 fps (without auto focusing) and 4 fps (with auto focusing) in full resolution. The 3D1 features a 3.5-inch touch screen on the camera’s back that lets you easily move through camera functions and recorded photos and videos.

3D Car photography

In 3D mode the Lumix 3D1 captures two images simultaneously: MPO (Multi Picture Object) three-dimensional files and standard JPEG. The MPO files can be viewed in 3D on your Panasonic 3D TV but won’t display on my Samsung 3D television. An alternative is to use the wonderful and free StereoPhoto Maker software and convert them into the kind of anaglyphic JPEG files you see here and can be viewed using the classic red/cyan 3D glasses. StereoPhoto Maker is Windows only and I run it under Windows on my iMac using Apple’s Boot Camp. If you want to view the images here in 3D, you can pick up red/cyan 3D glasses from many sources including Amazon, who even offers clip-on’s for eyeglass wearers.

Mustangs in 3D

Panasonic also makes the Lumix G 12.5mm f/12 lens for the Micro Four-thirds camera system. I have one and will have a post some 3D images later this year made at car shows and shot with the lens on one of my Panasonic cameras. In the meantime, you can read what Micro Four-thirds guru, Mark Toal has to say about the lens here.